Panafrican Studies and Research Center in International Relations and Education for Development
CEPARRED
JEDIRAF
Centre Panafricain d'Etudes et de Recherches en Relations Internationales et en Education pour le Développement

Abstracts
Résumés
 
 
 







Volume 4

Numbers/numéros 1-2, December/déceembre 2001
Les Pygmées, le Droit et la Culture:  Problématique sur la Construction de la Citoyenneté des Pygmées du Caméroun
Patrice Bigombe Logo
pp. 101-127

NOTA BENE: Articles in English have abstracts in French and vice versa/Les articles en anglais ont des résumés en français et vice versa.


 
 

LES PYGMÉES, LE DROIT ET LA CULTURE AU CAMEROUN:
ENTRE ALLEGEANCE COMMUNAUTAIRE ET BRICOLAGE D'UNE CITOYENNETÉÀ BAROQUE

Patrice Bigombe Logo

Abstract



 
 

      
In Cameroon, currently the basis for the construction of citizenship is not only political and economic, but also social and cultural. The challenging question is how to act and give meaningwithin the confinement of the society and communal allegiance, and allegiance to the State—to a social group whose mobility and itinerancy are undermined, and whose marginalization is maintained and legitimized by the state, its agents and partners. This social group is forced into domestication, and is subject to authoritarian standardization. 
       The political liberalization puts forward positing citizenship as a system of recognition and socio-political legitimization, a multifaceted and differential reality, a mode of social relations between individuals and with community.  Consequently, any approach to construct pygmies' citizenship, should not only articulate it in a context of hetero-determined  modernity, but also within the domestication of modernity.This approach inscribes the study of citizenship within the social dynamic foundations of their existence.
       Such a process would stem from recognition of the subjects' identity, their specificity, and the reinforcement of their openness to their societal environment.  This approach questions the normative assumptions of citizenship, and challenges the analysis that extracts people from their context and eco-culture.   Within this approach, the author argues that citizenship is a hybrid construct, a baroque, social and political process that provides the basis for—individualistic and holistic—individual and collective representations and legitimations.

 
 



 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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